Milan Canals, 1-Sheet Zines, Mobile Libraries, Map Secrets & More: Endnotes 06 March

Milan Canals, 1-Sheet Zines, Mobile Libraries, Map Secrets & More: Endnotes 06 March

Friday, 6 March, 2020

Every Friday, we celebrate the weekend — and all the reading and relaxing and daydreaming time ahead — with Melissa's favorite book- and travel-related links of the week. Why work when you can read fun stuff?!

This post is part of our Endnotes series.

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That’s the Alzaia Naviglio Grande above, one of two remaining canals in Milan, Italy. Back in the day, Milan was crisscrossed with canals, originally built to facilitate the construction of buildings that have become famous landmarks, like the Duomo and La Scala. Now, the canals make for a leisurely way to explore the Navigli neighborhood. The canal is an excellent place to catch the sunset. Aperitivo, anyone?

  • This is like catnip to me: The 19 Best Crime-Solving Writers in Fiction, Ranked I wholeheartedly agree with the #1 pick. (Also happy to see Mina Murrah-Harker from Dracula on the list.)

  • Judy Blume’s books were such a big part of my childhood — and a movie version of Are You There, God? It’s Me, Margaret is coming!

  • These mobile libraries (on bikes!) in Afghanistan will warm your heart: ‘Where they spread hate and fear, we will spread books and learning.’

  • In 1935, a movie director working for MGM Studios made a delightful 7-minute technicolor film of Prague.

  • Austin Kleon is an excellent human (and writer). He recently shared how to make a mini-zine from a single sheet of paper.

  • Scottish author Douglas Skelton explains why Scotland’s islands are such a great setting for mystery novels.

  • This is so great: When the CEO of Atlas Obscura resigned, his colleagues created the Plotz Plot in his honor. On the site is a small metal shed with a sign that reads ‘For those experiencing a life transition: This is a place to leave behind a piece of your former self.’

  • Errors in maps — both intentional and accidental — are not uncommon. Cartographers have been hiding cute illustrations inside maps of Switzerland for decades. According to a spokesperson, ‘Creativity has no place on these maps.’ We can only assume they sniffed imperiously as they said it.

marmot drawing hidden in a map
A marmot hiding in the Alps
  • Tom Cox’s writing is atmospheric and entertaining and makes me want to go wandering on a misty moor. (Read my review of his short story collection Help the Witch.) He’s got a new book coming called Notebook, and the description is a delight: ‘When my notebook was stolen last year, a lot of people suggested to me that it would be more sensible if from now on I recorded my notes on a phone or another portable device because that way, even if the device was lost or stolen, my notes would be backed up. I listened politely to their suggestion, knowing I would ignore it. I love notebooks…’ Read more and maybe pre-order a copy.

  • Overhead bins produce a particular type of rage.

  • Ramona Quimby and Jane Eyre are heroines for the ages.

  • Eater says that grocery stores are a must-visit travel destination. We would expand that to say grocery stores and bookshops are must-sees. (Here’s the recap of what happened when we went grocery shopping in Prague as tourists.)

  • In both the Scotland and Morocco episodes of our podcast, we talked about the magic of the oral storytelling tradition. The web site The House of Stories collects stories from around the world that you can browse by country or theme. In this video, Griot Chinyere shares a story from Africa; read the awesome background on her and her tale.

  • Bookish podcast of the week: Shedunnit is a podcast that ‘unravels the mysteries behind classic detective stories.’ In this episode, host Caroline Crampton digs into family meals that turn deadly in classic detective fiction. It’s delicious.

  • Travel podcast of the week: The Zero to Travel podcast is packed with inspiration and advice for travel newbies and nomads. In this episode, host Jason Moore gets real about how to overcome travel anxiety and fear of flying.

Wishing you the fortitude of Jane Eyre and the imagination of Ramona Quimby.

Top image courtesy of Cristina Gottardi.

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Every Friday, we share our favorite book- and travel-related links. This week, we've got a global landmarks quiz, the logic of spoken English, delightful old book illustrations, high-stakes hotel security, and more.
Every Friday, we share our favorite book- and travel-related links. This week, we've got the Phyrne Fisher movie, mid-century Gothic novels, Miss Havisham, Indian root bridges, the downside of solo travel, and more.
Every Friday, we share our favorite book- and travel-related links. This week, we've got the history of the drawing room, the scoop on jet lag, underwater photography, books Erik Larson loves, Taco Bell poetry, and more.

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