Scotland

Scotland


Whatever sort of stereotypical notions you have of Scotland are probably not too far off: a rebellious national spirit, a predilection for ghost stories, an affinity for smart plaids, and an appreciation of a wee dram o’ whisky. Scotland is all this and so much more.

In the city and out in nature, the scenery is craggy and brutally beautiful. There are castles and towers and keeps around every curve in the road. And the sheep! So many adorable sheep and cattle. You can head down the pub for an evening of singing folk songs — and, if you’re lucky, you might be told an appropriately moody story by an old Scot who can really spin a yarn.

The geography and weather of Scotland are characters in their own right. The southern part of the country nearer to England is moorland, and in the north are the Highlands with sharp mountains and sharper weather. The Atlantic coast on the west is like a serrated knife, indented with deep, cold lochs — and islands with long histories dot the ocean on both sides of the country.

our podcast

In this episode, we talk about how we fell in love with Scotland on our visit there. Then we discuss books that swept us away to that enchanting country: an Edinburgh ghost story, a memoir by one of Scotland’s most beloved sons, a story collection that celebrates the Scottish tradition of oral storytelling, and two books that explore the unique communities on islands in the Outer Hebrides.

We also enjoy a cozy chat with Tom Hodges, the owner of the brilliant bookshop, Typewronger Books in Edinburgh.

recommended books

The Blackhouse

buy | read review

The Lewis Man

buy | read review

The Chessmen

buy | read review

The Crofter and the Laird

buy | read review

City of Ghosts

buy | read review

Haunted Voices

buy | read review

Made In Scotland

buy | read review

His Bloody Project

buy | read review

The House Between Tides

buy | read review

Broken Ground

buy | read review

The Winter Sea

buy | read review

To the Hilt

buy | read review

The Hunting Party

buy | read review

Payment in Blood

buy | read review

featured posts

Stunning windswept landscapes, a rebellious national spirit, an affinity for smart tartan plaids, a predilection for ghost stories, and an appreciation of a wee dram o' whisky. Scotland is all this and so much more.
The Lewis Chessmen are 12th-century chess pieces carved from walrus ivory, and their origin story is shrouded in conjecture, academic rivalry, and murder. One undisputed fact: They are ridiculously cute.
Typewronger Books in Edinburgh is the bookish retreat of our dreams: a cozy shop that only has the good stuff with a literary magician behind the counter. He looks into your soul and gives you the right book.
How idyllic! A group of old friends from Oxford gather in a remote hunting lodge in Scotland to relax by the fire, drink bubbly, and reconnect. Then their New Year's Eve celebration goes horribly, fabulously wrong.
Every character in this vividly rendered historical novel needs a restorative cup of tea and homemade shortbread to help them chill out. Here's a killer recipe for shortbread, in case you need a sweet treat, too.
Bake a batch of Scotch eggs and get caught up in a police procedural that travels from a peat bog in the Scottish Highlands to beautiful Edinburgh. Sure, there's murder afoot, but that's no excuse to go hungry.
Craggy islands, damp peat bogs, twisty lanes of cobblestones, vast swaths of green to make your heart soar — Scotland is a beautiful country with larger-than-life heroes (and heroines) and more than a few ghosts.
It's a readers' paradise: buttery scones and shortbread and tea, a windy landscape with the scent of the sea, and bookshops. Oh, the bookshops! Every genre, new and used, and a bookstore cat. What else could you need?

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Top image courtesy of Jack Anstey/Unsplash.

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